Indian Matchmaking: Capitalising On The Arranged Marriage Market & Its Anxieties

When it’s this hot out, all you want to do is turn the AC up and go lie on the couch. But when something new and buzzy arrives, like Unsolved Mysteries or Love is Blind, we can’t help but dive in fully—because who doesn’t like shiny new things? And the latest and greatest on the streaming market is Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking , which premieres July Here’s the premise: Done with the horrifying downsides of dating apps and blind dates, young adults in the U. They enlist the services of Sima Taparia, a matchmaker who specializes in arranged marriages. Sounds intriguing, right? Here’s everything to know about your new favorite dating series.

Netflix’s ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is Your New Favorite Dating Show

Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based professional matchmaker, guides affluent young South Asians in the United States and metropolis like New Delhi and Mumbai in choosing life-partners that match their personal criteria. While there is plenty to be said about upper-class and upper-caste motivations to wed their children to certain people at a certain age, arranged marriages and the matchmaking journey are marketed as alternative dating formats something which is not new to Netflix given shows like Love is Blind.

The premise of the show is simple: Sima Taparia offers a multi-national and presumably expensive matchmaking service. Her clientele is largely composed of wealthy millennial Indians noticeably devoid of religious or ethnic diversity. The matchmaking, however, emphasizes the importance of family and parents as authority figures, often diluting the agencies of young people in the process.

The show confronts us with our own loneliness, presents marriage as a solution and Nadia and Vinay from ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ on a date. but the thing that makes arranged marriage inherently sinister (and different from.

I’ll post market design related news and items about repugnant markets. See also my Game theory, experimental economics, and market design page. I have a general-interest book on market design: Who Gets What–and Why The subtitle is “The new economics of matchmaking and market design. Post a Comment. Saturday, August 1, Arranged marriage, in India, on television. The Guardian and the Indian Express have the story about a tv show about arranged marriage, a venerable institution that is becoming controversial.

Cross-caste marriage in India can get you killed. But Indian Matchmaking dilutes an age-old practice by blunting the pointed shards on which it has stood for years. The end result is an eight-episode betrayal for the audience in India and a cut-to-fit documentary about the country and its traditions for the West, confirming every suspicion they nurtured. But in her job of a self-declared messiah it is never shown how much she earns intending to bring together people with the supposed divine connection, she falls back on caste, class, complexion, height and sometimes breadth of smiles as plausible criteria for two people to give each other a shot at spending their lives together.

‘Indian Matchmaking’: How Netflix’s hit dating show is changing reality TV

Updated : 20 days ago. If you scoff at the very thought of arranged marriage and what all it entails, and consider it to be the most regressive concept on the earth; read no further. Moreover, you will be able to relate to this bunch of young men and women on the lookout for life partners. So women like Sima aunty, become as important as tying the nuptial knot.

The series fleshes out a microcosm of Indian society, the upper class, both in India and foreign lands where despite dating apps and websites, Sima aunty has both rationale and reason to exist. Of course, she exists in real life as exactly what is shown in the series as a high profile matchmaker Sima Taparia.

On Netflix’s “Indian Matchmaking,” marriage consultant Sima Taparia travels the world to meet with hopeful clients and help them find the perfect match for an arranged marriage. This is a show that turns away from the “big fat Indian wedding” trope and Some dating apps even include skin tone filters.

Now available to stream, the series follows Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia as she painstakingly works with singles and their families in India and America to find desirable mates for marriage. One client, New Jersey-based event planner Nadia, wonders if her Indian-ness will come into question because of her Guyanese heritage.

With the global reach of Netflix, Mundhra saw an opportunity to present a look at dating and relationships through the very specific lens of the South Asian experience that would reach a wide audience. That we have all sorts of different backgrounds, different ideals and ideologies. I think you can sort of learn a lot just from the examples and the specific journey of the participants. Mundhra ultimately met her now-husband in graduate school. There was this refreshing honesty about her, and absolute passion for what she does.

Even as dating sites such as shaadi. Viewers get a glimpse of that process, which includes an emphasis on horoscopes and astrology. She often consults with a face reader on the series, getting detailed reports of her clients based off their facial features assessed via their photos. She also assembles biodata for each client, which is essentially a marital resume, and conducts in-person consultations with her clients and their families.

Taparia is still actively working with singles amid the COVID pandemic, though she has limited her consultations to phone and video. It goes on in my mind 24 hours.

Matrix of arranged marriage

Most of the experiences of the single millennials who revisit their cultural tradition of arranged marriages in Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking leave viewers with more questions than answers by the end of the reality series’ first season. Because the streaming service only gave the new dating show an initial eight-episode order, the potential for an Indian Matchmaking Season 2 is another question mark that fans have been left to ponder for now, too. Although one marriage seems imminent, the other couples’ uncertain futures leave the door open for additional updates — or even a whole new cast, should the freshman series return.

Indian Matchmaking Season 1 features elite Indian matchmaker Sima Taparia thoroughly analyzing various clients through everything from their personality profiles to their astrological charts in order to help them find a perfect pairing. From Houston to Chicago to Mumbai, the young singles “go on sometimes fun, sometimes awkward first dates — often with their family in tow — to discover whether these good-on-paper matches can turn into a love that lasts a lifetime,” per Netflix’s official synopsis.

Netflix’s vice president of nonfiction series and comedy specials Brandon Riegg explained to Variety that Indian Matchmaking taps into a world much different than the typical millennial dating apps, calling the show “full of heart.

She’s dating a white boy and it’s a big deal for my parents to be so accepting They need to make a show on real-life arranged marriages.

Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U. Sima meets three unlucky-in-love clients: a stubborn Houston lawyer, a picky Mumbai bachelor and a misunderstood Morris Plains, N. Friends and family get honest with Pradhyuman. Sima consults a face reader for clarity on her clients. A setback with Vinay temporarily discourages Nadia. Sima offers two more prospects to Aparna.

Feeling the pressure, Pradhyuman finally goes on a date.

Matchmaking TV: Take a chill pill on a reality show about arranged Indian marriages

And on social media, there is a raging storm over sexism, casteism, colourism and other isms. After all, alliances are not between individuals, but families. The son, no surprise, is looking for someone like mummy. And yet, IM underplays the seedier underbelly of the marriage market. Dowry, for instance, is excised from the show.

As Netflix’s eight-episode reality show, Indian Matchmaking (IM) kicks off, the conversation about the business of arranged marriages has.

The new reality-cum-documentary show, Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking by Smriti Mundhra is a binge-worthy show that will have foreigners confused and Indians slightly disturbed with the realities of an arranged marriage process. You can call her the ‘Human Tinder’ if you’d like, but just remember she doesn’t endorse hook-ups.

Sima aunty, as they call her, uses her skills as a matchmaker to make compatible people meet as prospective life partners. Her qualifications include the ability to jot down adjectives given by her clients such as ‘modern but traditional’, ‘flexible’, and match them to people she thinks embodies these qualities. Taparia claims to be a professional matchmaker but she doesn’t seem to do more than the next-door neighbour that brings random rishtas proposals to your door.

Nevertheless, the protagonists and their families decide to entrust her with their future partner and with their money. With Sima travelling from the U. S to India even more frequently than our PM’s international visits and her round-the-clock availability, they have to be paying her an amount unimaginable to the middle-class Indian. It focusses on arranged marriages but among the elite, the cream of Indian society.

It’s a glamorised, glossy show that offers a peek into ‘crazy rich Indians’ if you will. She is the cupid that brings upper-caste and upper-class Indians together so that they can maintain their privilege for generations. These crazy rich Indians although possess wealth and established careers, suffer from loneliness.

New dating app is like the Tinder of arranged marriages

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Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking by Smriti Mundhra is a show that entertains The show holds a mirror to the reality of arranged marriages in India.

To her surprise, the year-old met her future husband and is set to get married in January next year. Mumbai-based Anindita Dey—married for over a year now — also met her husband through her parents. However, Anindita makes it clear that while it was her parents who set up the meeting, the final decision was completely hers. Louis Superman, which she shared with Sami Khan. Because Indian Matchmaking follows matchmaker Sima Taparia analysing families and boys and girls to find suitable matches.

In an age when people believed to be largely pushing away the stereotypes, breaking free from the regressive patriarchal mind-set of society, this show throws light on the ugly truth of Indian matchmaking. In other words, it hits the bullseye when showcasing the circus that Indian marriages, mostly considering how even the most well-to-do families can’t still avoid checking the kundali, complexion or height among other conventional criteria.

But it simultaneously hurts because it is the reality that people face once in their lifetimes and want to forget. Sima Taparia, who has been a matchmaker since , finds nothing backward in her business.

Unless You’re Brown, ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is Not Yours to Criticize

Arranged marriages are complicated by definition: The bride and groom are selected by a third party rather than by each other. Entire families immerse themselves in the relationship, from the lead-up to the wedding and beyond the ceremony. As each husband and wife adjusts to new roles and faces a level of intimacy not common in most modern unions, issues like pregnancy scares, money squabbles and meddling parents add more stress and potential roadblocks to long-lasting arrangements.

The newly minted Netflix star has some thoughts on how the show was conversations about what the reality dating show does or doesn’t mean for their experiences with arranged marriages and navigating issues of caste.

All the emotions of that time came rushing back while she watched Netflix’s newest ‘dating show’: Indian Matchmaking. The reality show about a high-flying Indian matchmaker named Sima Taparia has spawned thousands of articles, social media takes, critiques and memes. More importantly, it’s inspired real-life conversations about what it means to be a young South Asian person trying to navigate marriage, love — and yes, parental expectations.

Many young South Asian Australians told ABC Life they’ve seen aspects of their real lives being played out in the show, but that of course, one reality program could never capture the myriad experiences of people across many communities, language groups, religions, genders, sexualities, traditions and castes of the subcontinental region. Some have given up on the tradition by choosing a partner through Western dating, while others have modernised it and made it work for them.

A common thread among all was the question: “How do I keep my parents happy while also doing what I need for myself? For Manimekalai, the force of tradition and expectation from her family to agree to the marriage was strong. The first time her parents started approaching their extended family and friend networks to find a prospective groom, they didn’t even inform her.

“Arranged Marriage” Shortfilm